YouTube creators are struggling with account hijacks

If you’re one of YouTube’s creators, you need to be wary of the accounts hijacks the community has recently been dealing with.

The whole thing seems to be a coordinated attack on YouTube’s cybersecurity defences.

So far, the following big names have been hit:

– Troy Sowers
– MaxtChekVids
– Musafir
– Built
– PURE Function

Allegedly, the hackers are resorting to phishing techniques to trick their victims into letting go of their login credentials and inputting them into fake Google login forms.

After obtaining them, they proceed to take over the victim’s channel and transfer it to another owner.

To cover their tracks, they change the channel URL to give the users the impression that the original account has been deleted.

One of the shocking feats these hackers have been able to achieve is to bypass the two-factor authentication that protects the original owners’ accounts.

Some reports suggest they’ve also been using Modlishka, a reverse proxy-based toolkit for phishing.

For whaIf you’re one of YouTube’s creators, you need to be wary of the accounts hijacks the community has recently been dealing with.

The whole thing seems to be a coordinated attack on YouTube’s cybersecurity defences.

So far, the following big names have been hit:

– Troy Sowers
– MaxtChekVids
– Musafir
– Built
– PURE Function

Allegedly, the hackers are resorting to phishing techniques to trick their victims into letting go of their login credentials and inputting them into fake Google login forms.

After obtaining them, they proceed to take over the victim’s channel and transfer it to another owner.

To cover their tracks, they change the channel URL to give the users the impression that the original account has been deleted.

One of the shocking feats these hackers have been able to achieve is to bypass the two-factor authentication that protects the original owners’ accounts.

Some reports suggest they’ve also been using Modlishka, a reverse proxy-based toolkit for phishing.

For whatever reason, the hackers seem to be after YouTube’s car community.

The most likely explanation for this is that they’ve gotten their hands on a list of email addresses belonging to a specific sector.

In order to get the most money out of it, the hackers are under a tremendous amount of pressure to sell the accounts fast.

Otherwise, there’s a risk of YouTube getting involved and returning them to their rightful owners.

If they don’t accomplish this objective in a timely manner, their efforts will be in vain.

tever reason, the hackers seem to be after YouTube’s car community.

The most likely explanation for this is that they’ve gotten their hands on a list of email addresses belonging to a specific sector.

In order to get the most money out of it, the hackers are under a tremendous amount of pressure to sell the accounts fast.

Otherwise, there’s a risk of YouTube getting involved and returning them to their rightful owners.

If they don’t accomplish this objective in a timely manner, their efforts will be in vain.